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  • #13287
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    I blame my dad entirely for my passion for cars. He’s a mechanic by trade, but he also enjoys tinkering with cars in his free time.

    So, I grew up surrounded by cars, and from an early age I wanted to spend all of my time with him, watching what he was doing, learning, and just generally getting under his feet and in his way. Fast forward to today, and I’m much the same, albeit now I’ve got a bit more knowledge, and am now a bit too tall to literally get “under his feet” (but I sometimes still do in the figurative way).

    In the mid 90’s, my dad got his 2nd Ford Anglia – a 1966 Deluxe, which was in quite a sad state, and needed a bit of repair work. Unfortunately time was tight, so it was completed, with a 1500GT engine (later a 1300 crossflow) and it went on the road. I loved going out in the car, it turned heads everywhere. A few years later, he picked up another, in worse condition! This one took longer to restore, but having done something with “period” mods, this one went extreme – he took the largest shoehorn he could find, and squeezed in the full running gear from a Subaru estate car – 1800cc flat four engine and full 4WD running gear.

    In 2003 I managed to get hold of a 1967 Ford Anglia Deluxe, which had failed it’s MOT on a few items and the current owner couldn’t afford the repairs. I started off by getting myself a Mk2 Escort with a 1600 crossflow, with plans of putting that in. I made a start, but didn’t get much further than stripping the car to mostly a bare shell with the Escort front suspension fitted, before other events took over and it got sidetracked.

    I then changed my daily driver to a Honda Prelude 2.2 VTEC, and decided that my “fun” weekend car shouldn’t be slower than my daily driver, so got hold of a Nissan 200SX S13, with a 1800 turbo engine.

    I stripped this down, but before I could make a start, I ended up damaging my Prelude, so spent a few months rebuilding that! The Anglia took a back seat again. Unfortunately, it continued to take a back seat until October 2010, when I started again on it.

    The years sat outside at my dad’s place had taken their toll on the car, which had developed much more rust, and it required quite a bit more work than it would have done 6 years earlier…

    So we removed the rust, and using replacement body parts from the Owner’s Club, repaired these areas and put strength back into the car.

    Removing rust…

    Fitting new bits…

    Nice new, strong metal…

    Once the strength was put into the chassis, it was time to start thinking about fitting the running gear.

    However, I’d since (again) changed my daily driver to a Mitsubishi Legnum VR-4, and the 1.8 turbo engine again would have been less powerful than my daily driver! So… I’ve changed the choice of engine (again)!

    So, introducing the Mitsubishi 6A13TT engine, as is in my Legnum VR-4:

    2500cc, V6, 24 valve, quad cam, twin turbo, 280bhp.

    With an engine from an old Galant (the saloon version of my Legnum estate), I decided to see whether it would fit in the engine bay of the Anglia.


    Lifting it towards the unsuspecting car


    With the turbos still attached… not quite, how about without the turbos?


    Much better!!

    The 6A13 engine was never used in a Rear Wheel Drive vehicle by Mitsubishi, therefore, there are no gearboxes available “off the shelf” that will allow it to be used longitudinally.

    The 6A13 is, however, compatible with gearboxes that also bolt up to the Lancer Evolution IV onwards 4G63T – but, the same problem comes – it comes in no vehicles where it’s used in a RWD configuration…

    So… to the drawing board we go to find a gearbox.

    Well, from my previous running gear selection, I just so happen to have a FS5W71C gearbox from the Nissan 200SX sitting around… it’s fairly compact, and the bellhousing looks a similar size to the bolt pattern for the 6A13 engine.

    We had to design and have made some adapter plates to be able to attach the two together, so we began to make some templates.

    I picked up an FTO flywheel, which is the same 225mm as the Nissan gearbox (the engine came from an automatic), but with the 8mm adapter plate we had made by a local engineering firm, the back edge of the flywheel was a bit too close for comfort, so we had made up a 5mm spacer to bring the flywheel away from the block.

    In a RWD box, the input shaft is supported in the end of the crank, but in a FWD or transverse gearbox (as in the VR-4) has the input shaft supported both ends within the gearbox itself, so there are no spigot bushes, and therefore no way to mount one into the VR-4 engine. So, again to our local engineering firm, who turned us up a spigot adapter to fit the end of the crank, and to fit the brass spigot bush from the 200SX.

    With these adapter plates made up, and a combination of Mitsubishi FTO flywheel and clutch and the Nissan clutch, and a home-brew release bearing using FTO/200SX bits, we have managed to mate up the Mitsubishi 6A13TT engine to the Nissan 200SX FS5W71C gearbox!

    We then began to fit the gearbox into the car, making up a custom gearbox cross-member, and minor modifications to move the location of the gear lever.

    We were then able to drop the engine in place, mate it up to the gearbox again, and even fit the Nissan propshaft – which was the perfect length to mate up to the standard Anglia rear axle!!

    So, here we are, with engine/gearbox/propshaft bolted together – next on the list is to modify the front crossmember to remove the existing engine mounts, as we’ll be making up new custom engine mounts.

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    #26982
    Romany Palmer
    Admin
    Club Member

    Hmmm, that’ll be interesting. 8)

    Nice work bud.

    #26990
    Dalek
    Participant

    :shock:

    I take it you will increase the compression ratio somehow or relocate the turbo ?

    Interesting stuff :D

    #26995
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    I’ll find somewhere in the engine bay to shove the turbos.

    The Galant did come with a 2.5 V6 which is N/A, but where’s the fun in that?? ;)

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    #27025
    Ken B
    Moderator
    Club Member

    I see in one pic you’ve lowered your steering rack. Is that where its staying? or are you putting it back where its meant to be? I did read on your website you toyed with Triumph Herald wishbone set up, I’m glad you’re not using that idea, as you only have to sneeze on those wishbones and they bend.

    #27026
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    With the rack in the normal location it’s trying to be in the middle of the bottom of the engine, so we have lowered it. I know it’ll affect steering geometry a bit, but will have to do some calculations and further mods if necessary.

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    #27027
    Ken B
    Moderator
    Club Member

    I was actually quite amazed you got it in with a front bowl sump with front mounted rack in the first place!! Has it left much room for a rad. I doubt the ‘normal VW Polo’ will keep that cool…lol
    You do like a good challenge dont you.

    #27028
    Ken B
    Moderator
    Club Member

    Oh forgot to mention if you look on some of the oval race suppies site and possibly Rally Design, you will find some taper pins that will drop the postion of the track rod end so to speak. You may have to use spherical rod ends with these instead, but it may save the messing around of altering anything else, and put your steering rack arms back at the right angle in relation to the TCA’s, or somewhere near it.

    #27029
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    Oooh, excellent :) Cheers for that little tip, Ken :) If you happen across any links on your travels, will you let me know?

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    #27030
    Ken B
    Moderator
    Club Member

    just when you need it cant find the pics i saw originally. but it looks similar to this. Deffo seem them over here somewhere.

    http://www.ovlov.net/page.php?page_name=bumpsteer

    You could make them yourself, but obviously needs to be from the correct type steel not ordinary mild steel.

    #27080
    paddi
    Participant
    Club Member

    Impressive! Most impressive!

    Cant wait to see this one in action. There’s modifying, and there’s modifying – you boys certainly like a challenge!

    Well done – please keep a records of where you’re at with this as it would be great to feature it in the club magazine when it’s finished.

    8)

    #27098
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    We certainly like a challenge – it’s been 11 years since the 4WD one was completed (yes, really, it’s been that long!) so we felt it time for another crazy Anglia to hit the club ;)

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    #27200
    Ken B
    Moderator
    Club Member

    Here you go I knew i’d seen this bump steer kit idea somewhere on a UK forum.

    http://www.turbosport.co.uk/showthread.php?171637-Does-anyone-manufacture-a-bump-steer-kit-for-mk1

    Alan Dent is your man for extended pins for your steering arms. Not ideal for road use really, depends how much you need to drop.

    #27233
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    Upon my travels of the internet I found this – I know it’s old, but the old ones are often the funniest!

    [youtube:phajgvc8]cY1YndLmbXQ[/youtube:phajgvc8]

    I left you last time with a marriage of an engine and a gearbox mated together – which even I wasn’t sure would have worked until we managed it!

    The next issue to tackle was that of actually starting the car. Our adapter plates were taken back to our local engineer with some more rough scribbles, and they were returned with some new holes.

    A minor tweak, and the starter bolted up to the engine, and in line with the flywheel – and then, for the moment of truth… would it work?

    [youtube:phajgvc8]siSf3AKSvK0[/youtube:phajgvc8]

    Success! Next, to get the starter fitted to the gearbox. A small bit of cutting later…

    As you can hopefully see, the starter is rather close to the crossmember – and the gearbox is currently lifted higher than it will usually sit – which means that the starter will be trying to sit in the crossmember, so some modifications are required.

    So, we cut away a section, and reinforced where we’d removed, as well as reinforcing where we’d cut away the original engine mounts, as we’d not be needing them.

    The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed a couple of blocks of wood between the front crossmember and the sump of the engine in the final picture of my last update – this is what was supporting the engine in the right position. I don’t think that would have been a long-term solution, so a proper engine mount is required.

    Upon my browsing of forums as I usually do of an evening, I happened upon someone selling a brand new engine mount from a Honda Integra DC2 – which looked like it might fit the bill. I promptly purchased it, and work began on making it fit. A large chunk of the original engine mount was removed, and a wonderful looking mounting bracket was created.

    In order to support this, we’d need some quite hefty bracing, so the remainder of the bodywork was removed, and some additional box section was grafted into place.

    The engine was then lifted back into position, and the front engine mount was affixed securely to a beefy bit of box section, and the engine suspended from it, and the gearbox crossmember.

    With the front and rear mounts sorted, something was needed to stop the roll of the engine. Using the mount from the Honda Integra gave me another idea. I often see Hondas with “engine torque dampers” to reduce the engine movement from their huge torque outputs *snigger* – these are small units which don’t take up much room… perfect for this case.

    So, a couple were purchased, and mounts made to prevent the roll on the engine.

    There we are – that should damp more torque than the 2 Hondas they were no doubt previously destined for!

    And finally – another treat, a video which is “out of order” of the text above, but I couldn’t leave this update without putting it in!

    [youtube:phajgvc8]hKHq2oAZyLY[/youtube:phajgvc8]

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    #27339
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    I thought it about time some control was brought to this project!

    So, first off, how about some engine control, with the beginning of some of the multitude of wiring? I’m stripping out wiring for any systems that were present on the Galant, and won’t be on the Anglia.

    So, that means removing: ABS, ASC, AYC, SRS, TCL and Automatic Gearbox ECU.

    After starting with the engine and ECU looms, and re-routing, we’re currently set up as such:

    Before going too much further with the wiring under the dash, a small amount of adjustment is required to fit the water manifold to the back of the engine. Firstly we had to trim down the top of the gearbox casing.

    And in order to run the coolant hoses to the front, a small amount from the bulkhead.

    Next on the agenda is some way of telling the car where to go, so… one Mitsubishi steering column and wheel :)

    With the ability to steer, I think the ability to move and stop might be the next logical step.

    Before:

    After:

    The clutch/brake pedals are an old set of dual controls which were removed from another car, and the accelerator is from the 200SX.

    Now that the steering and pedals are done, the bit of floor that had been hacked about to previously fit the Escort steering column was then replaced with a nice fresh bit of steel.

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