Home Forums Gallery Modified and Projects Confused’s Long-Term Project Thread

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  • #27341
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    The biggest issue we’ve been worrying about is how we’re going to fit the turbos. They won’t fit in their standard locations. We decided to bite the bullet, and try to come up with a solution.

    We took a trip to our local engineering firm again with a rear turbo, and a sheet of steel, and came back with a set of flanges:

    One of the flanges bolted to the rear manifold:

    A small bit of nice thick pipe (Mitsubishi L200 rear bumper bar):

    And one turbo in place:

    Now to rinse and repeat for the other side:

    Next step is the downpipes, so out with a nice bit of stainless steel rear bumper bar, marked out, cut and welded into place:

    Once we’d marked up where the downpipe would fit, we extended the hole in the flange to incorporate the wastegate before welding it all together.

    Well… that wasn’t as bad as we expected – only a day to mount two turbos and one exhaust downpipe. So, yes, we have blown it now! ;)

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    #27348
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    With one downpipe completed, it’s time to move the turbo back to the other side, and make another.

    So, one flange marked and hole enlarged to suit and welded together:

    And fitted in place:

    Once that was done, we moved efforts onto the brake/clutch, which we’d started a couple of days ago. We had sitting around brake and clutch master cylinders from a Honda Prelude, so began trying to make them fit. However, the brake master cylinder was too big, and we couldn’t get a smooth enough action.

    We had to take a trip to the scrapyard to get rid of some old junk, so we did our “Scrapheap Challenge” bit and looked around, and came back with a brake master cylinder from a 2001 Fiat Punto, which wasn’t as long, and, we made up a bracket to hold them in place. Also from the Punto came the reservoir, which is shared between brake and clutch – which means less things to fit into the engine bay on the Anglia!

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    #27367
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    This will be the final update from the week of work on the Anglia, so we finished the week by finishing up a couple of bits that had been partly started.

    First off, the propshaft. The Nissan propshaft was the perfect length to mate up the gearbox and the standard Anglia rear axle, but it wasn’t supported at it’s centre joint, well, other than by a small piece of electrical wire!

    A more permanent solution was required, so a couple of small bits of box section, with a bolt welded in place, and then welded to the inside of the transmission tunnel should do the trick:

    Moving into the car, and the steering shaft needed supporting between two of the joints. A simple bracket, and that was done:

    I also managed to pick up another rear turbo and manifold, as well as a manual throttle body, which doesn’t have the Traction Control stuff on the side of it. We bolted the turbos into place, and we could now see how the space was being used up quite quickly!

    During the making of the pipework for the turbos, we decided to drag the fibreglass flip front out, and put it on the car, to ensure we’d have the required clearance under the bonnet for the myriad of pipework that will be required. So, here’s a couple of photos of it looking somewhat more like a normal Ford Anglia.

    Unfortunately the current schedule of visits every 4 weeks means that the next scheduled visit falls on the weekend Christmas, so no work will get done then! So, you’ll have to tune in at the end of January for the next instalment!

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    #27473
    starbuck
    Participant

    wow, lot of work, but coming together well, not much room left now!

    #27604
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    Continuing the tradition of “do something when we think about it”, the next thing we decided to tackle was the seats.

    Going to the magical store room of bits that my dad has acquired over the years, we managed to find a pair of seats that were originally in a Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VI, that were removed by Ralliart when they fitted the Recaro seats prior to selling them through the UK dealer networks.

    So, we measured up, marked, measured up again, cut, put in place, and bolted/welded some supports to the floor, which will both reinforce where the seats will sit, and also allow the seat to be both level, square, and moveable.

    This then allowed the seats to be put in place, and bolted down securely.

    Attention next moved to the engine again, and the eternal question that we’ve been asking since deciding to use this engine… how are we going to actually plumb in all of the inlet pipework!?

    I’ve been wanting to put an intercooler at the front of the car, not only does it look cool, but it will keep the inlet temperatures down. Which would mean combining the output from the two turbos, installing the intercooler, piping to and from it, and then round to the inlet on the back of the engine. Not to mention, that the pipework from the filter to the turbos also has to be put in place!

    However, putting my sensible hat on, this is not going to be a track car, this is not going to be used at full power for prolonged periods (there’s nowhere other than a track where I could potentially even use it for those purposes!) – so a decision was made to do away with the intercooler.

    This made the decision on the pipework much simper – it wouldn’t need to come down to the front of the car, so that space can be free up for pre-turbo pipework, and more essential stuff like a coolant radiator and fans!

    To that end, we got to work.

    First off was to turn the compressor side of the driver’s side turbo round, and making up a bracket to hold the wastegate actuator in the correct place.

    From the original VR4, I had the Y pipe that usually runs across the top of the engine, and I also acquired another. These got chopped up for bits, and a new Y pipe was made, bringing the outlet from both turbos to the centre of the engine, to head to the back, ready to loop round and into the throttle body.

    As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words…

    A couple of brackets will need to be removed from the intake plenum so that it will sit down flush, but that’ll be a task for next time.

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    #27696
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    Although it’s hardly happened so far, which I for one am exceptionally surprised about, something that we’ve done hasn’t been quite right, and could be improved upon.

    This something was the brake & clutch master cylinders.

    The place we’d positioned them previously meant that the movement on the arms from the pedals wasn’t entirely smooth, and there was little space between them and the throttle body, so getting some kind of pipework onto the throttle body would have proved very difficult.

    Therefore, it was decided to move them, and do our most major bit of bodywork refabrication to date.

    A section of the bulkhead was cut out, and a new bit welded in which will allow the master cylinders to be recessed slightly, and further back.

    This brought the arms from the pedals to a more upright position, and is acting more directly on the pistons within the cylinders. It also gives more clearance between the throttle body and the pedal arms, which was then improved further, by a few modifications to the inlet plenum.

    Due to the reorientation of the turbo and the inlet pipework, the plenum required a few brackets removing, and an end chopped off, so that it will sit fully down onto the engine. A small amount was taken from the end where the throttle body is, to angle the throttle body upwards slightly, again giving more clearance for the intake pipework to fit.

    The plenum will be taken to be welded up fully soon.

    Some water pipes were also made up on both sides of the engine for cooling of the turbos.

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    #27700
    brad105ebug
    Participant

    Its looking great mate going to be brilliant when its done! :mrgreen:

    #27870
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    We’ve come to a point where the engine and gearbox being in the car is preventing us from moving on.

    There’s minor tweaks that need to take place to the inner wings with a large hammer, there’s more pipework for the turbos to be made, and stuff like brake/clutch lines to be made up, and all of this stuff will be much easier with the engine and gearbox not in the way.

    We disconnected the wiring from the engine, dropped the front crossmember down to allow us room to move the engine, and decided to see whether we could remove both engine and gearbox as one complete unit.

    We couldn’t.

    There was not enough movement for the sump to clear the front chassis rail. We’d already decided long ago that we’d remove this and replace it with a bolt-in section, and now seemed the perfect opportunity to do so.

    We made some measurements, and went about cutting this front rail out. It went with a small “ping” as the chassis, relieved of tension, sprung apart by about 5mm. Good job we’d measured first!

    With the bulk removed, we continued lifting the engine and gearbox out.

    (Excuse my dad’s “I’m looking quite smug” look! I was actually sporting one too, but seeing as I was behind the camera, not in front of it…)

    With the engine out, we moved it onto the bench, and could see better the oil filter in place on the side of the block (usually on a VR-4 there is a 90 degree adapter and it’s lower down, facing upwards), the turbo coolant pipework, as well as the adapters to move the turbos to a more suitable location.

    (Some blatant product placement again… but you can’t beat a nice Hobnob and a cup of coffee to keep your strength up!)

    With the engine and gearbox safely on the bench, attention turned to putting the strength back into the chassis that we’d cut out earlier.

    We began by removing the remaining parts of the original front panel.

    Then made up and welded in place some new bits, along with studs for location and securing.

    The new crossmember was made up with brackets on the ends.

    And bolted into place.

    This is bolted both from the front, and the sides, and will pull the chassis rails back together to the same measurements they were before removing the original front panel.

    Next, we added some mounts for the anti-roll bar.

    The left-over time today was used to do a little bit of welding to tidy up a previously added panel – the driver’s floor pan.

    We also added an additional mounting bolt for the suspension crossmember, just behind where we’d added the support for the engine roll-stop mounts (not pictured, but just behind the support to the left of the above photo)

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    #27874
    paddi
    Participant
    Club Member

    Looking Good! I would never of believed that it would all have fitted!

    8)

    #27988
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    With the engine & gearbox out and on the bench, it’s time to do some of the bits that are easiest done whilst the engine isn’t in the car.

    When I removed the engine from the Galant, it was late one evening and I had limited tools, and I was unable to separate the gearbox and transfer box, or remove the torque converter! So, in the limited time I had, I decided the easiest thing was to remove the sump – so this needs to be sealed up properly again. Whilst the sump was off being cleaned, why not give it all a little squirt of paint to tidy it up a little?

    The very bottom sump pan isn’t in great condition, so I’ll be looking for a replacement – hence why it’s not been painted yet!

    Also gave the exhaust bits a lick of high temperature paint to cover the bare welds.

    During storage, the original 200SX gearbox got slightly waterlogged, and it’s no longer particularly smooth. I managed to pick up another gearbox in good condition, doing a swap for the 200SX engine. This then needed modding as the original did to fit the starter motor and the water manifold to the engine. As it was originally modded in the car, the cuts weren’t the neatest, so with the new gearbox on the bench, the modifications were made again, neater, and with a closer fit. It then had a good clean down, and a squirt with some paint as well.

    Whilst the paint was drying, another small patch on the chassis, this one to cover over the original holes for the pedals, and cleaned up and slightly enlarged the holes cut out for access to the coolant pipes in the bulkhead, and for ease of fitting the alternator in the inner wing. These holes will have small ridges welded around them for screw-in panels at a later date.

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    #27995
    paddi
    Participant
    Club Member

    Looking like a very fast car indeed mate – Look forward to seeing it when it’s done!

    Regards

    Paddi

    #28171
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    By moving the turbos from their natural home, the original oil and water feed & return pipes were no longer suitable. The water pipes have already been done, but the oil pipes required a bit of external help to ensure we had pipework suitable for the temperature and pressure of the oil. We contacted Hosequip who are based not far down the road, and talked to John who has made up some wonderful braided hoses.

    With these in place, and the oil feed coming from the back of the block, we reassembled the rest of the engine and gearbox, and checked the fit of the starter motor with the new gearbox.

    Before fitting this back into the car, we started to run the brake and clutch lines down the corner of the engine bay – access is a little tricky with the engine in place!

    The new oil lines look great through the front.

    We’d identified that the original gearbox mount we made was not quite correctly aligned, and was putting some twist into the mount – but it was done before the engine & gearbox were properly mounted, so it’s not too surprising that it needed a small tweak. Once this was done, and the rubber mount sitting correctly, we attached the clutch slave cylinder to the side of the gearbox.

    Taking some more of the stainless bumper bars, we continued working on the exhaust.

    Using two corner pieces, and the centre section of the bit used for the bits directly off the turbos, we brought the pipes towards the gearbox, away from the steering column, and turned towards the back of the car.

    ]

    From the side it looks a little low, but none of it is any lower than the front crossmember, which is the lowest point of the car – there’s still plenty of ground clearance so speedbumps shouldn’t be an issue I hope!

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    #28265
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    A bit more exhaustive work for this update. The next thing on the list was to continue with the exhaust. After getting down to the underneath of the car last time, we chopped off the excess, and welded on some flanges, and added a flexi section to allow engine movement, one with the mounting for an oxygen sensor, and a pair of nice straight bits of stainless pipe (Isuzu Trooper side step bars).

    Also, whilst we were underneath the car, we’ve run two brake pipes from the master cylinder to the boot, where the brakes will be assisted by a pair of 1.9:1 remote brake servos. We also ran the fuel feed and return pipes from the engine bay to the boot, where we will put a petrol tank.

    To finish off, another braided hose from Hosequip for the clutch, a couple of inches longer than the standard 200SX hose, and we were able to test out the clutch for the first time.

    Unfortunately, a little hitch – the clutch is VERY heavy to use. However, whilst wandering around the Bromley Pageant of Motoring yesterday (where we went with my dad’s 4 wheel drive Anglia) we found a 3:1 ratio remote brake servo, which should reduce the effort required to operate the clutch.

    So, looks like it’ll need yet another pipe running to the boot and back down the length of the car!

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    #28273
    Mo
    Participant
    Club Member

    It’s looking really good. One thing I have noticed and not sure if it will be a problem is the picture of the 2 brake pipes under the car, they seem to be running above the exhausts!!!, would the heat from them not affect the brake fluid in any way??.

    #28274
    Confused
    Admin
    Club Member

    I knew someone would say that! They’re not actually as close as they look in the photo!

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