Home Forums General Technical Help fRONT WHEEL DRUM BINDING.

This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  brianw 3 weeks ago.

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  • #64120

    Denman Ken
    Participant
    Club Member

    My Anglia delux 1964 was off the road in storage for almost 30 years. I then spent some time working on the car and it was only some two years ago it was back on the road. I noticed that the drivers side wheel was very stiff to turn by hand when jacked up. But nevertheless I used the vehicle from time to time. The stiffness in the wheel being always present. I have only done some 300 miles since it was back on the road. Recently, i decided to check what was causing the stiffness/binding of the front wheel. On removing the drum I decided to renew the brake pistons and shoes. However, after replacing the wheel the binding and stiffness to turn the wheel was still present. To try and eliminate the possible causes I removed the passenger side wheel drum and put the drivers side drum in its place and the drum rotated freely on this wheel. I then put the passengers side drum on the driver wheel but again heavy stiffness was experienced in turning the wheel by hand. I then removed the brake shoes off the passenger wheel and the drum turned freely. It is only when the shoes are on the wheel that the heavy stiffness occurs. Please note the hubb bearings are in good condition and the shoes were centralised and adjusted to their lowest position but the binding remains. I would be most grateful if anyone can suggest the cause of this problem and what course of action I should take to remedy the problem. Many thanks ken

    #64121

    JAN
    Participant

    Either: (I) the shoes are over-adjusted; or (ii) one or both wheel cylinders are partially seized not allowing the shoe to pull away from the drum; or the pull off springs are weak so not pulling the shoes away from the drum (Unlikely).

    The drum itself won’t cause it.

    #64129

    Denman Ken
    Participant
    Club Member

    Thank you Jen for your suggestions. The wheel cylinders are new and I can see that the cylinders are fully compressed. The springs are very strong as i get difficulty in stretching them to get the shoes on and off. The drum rotates freely with no shoes on the passenger wheel but is very stiff to rotate with the shoes on. I am stumped at this stage and wonder if the shaft is bent and this being highlighted when the shoes are on!! It is not obvious that the shaft is bent and I certainly have not had an incident to cause this. I have checked if the cylinders are correctly placed but note they can only go in one position. Any further suggestions please!! Many thanks ken

    #64132

    peteleo
    Participant

    You mentioned that you replaced the shoes. Are these reconditioned ? It may be that the linings are too thick.

    #64133

    JAN
    Participant

    I’m wondering how you get the drum on and off in these circumstances?

    #64158

    member2617
    Participant

    Have you got the right shoe springs?

    #64159

    JAN
    Participant

    The thing is, if the shoes are binding against the drum, I can’t see how you could get the drum on past the tight shoes. Usually you wind the adjusters right back, fit the drum and then adjust so that the shoes are barely in contact. What happens if, with the drum on, you wind the adjusters right back? Does the drum rotate freely? If so then it’s a matter of shoe contact, either over-adjusted or the shoes not returning. If not you need to look elsewhere. A remote possibility is that the binding happens with the roadwheel on but not if it’s removed, suggesting the stub-axle bent upwards so the tyre binds on the strut. I have seen this.

    #64198

    Denman Ken
    Participant
    Club Member

    Thank you Jan and Peteleo for your replies. Taking all points raised into account I carried out a number of further tests on the binding wheel; (I nearly said Bl—y wheel). A friend suggested I put a little talc. powder on the inside of the drum and replace it on wheel and force a rotation on the wheel. This i did and then removed the drum (with difficulty) only to find the talc was evident on only one shoe. I removed this shoe, replaced the drum and as expected the drum turned freely on the shaft. As I had replaced both shoes and pistons a close inspection of these and comparing them to the originals, small differences were noticed; namely shoe was slightly different in that lining was thicker, the shoe seemed slightly longer and the adjusting pivot slightly positioned differently. It seemed that my replacement shoe and possibly piston also were slightly different all contributing to the the problems I encountered. The drivers side wheel did not give these problems with the new piston and shoes.
    I then took the ‘best shoe’ from those that had been replaced and put it on the wheel, replaced the drum and it spun freely on the shaft.
    Now to bleeding the brakes!!!
    Thank you again for your help
    Ken

    #64261

    brianw
    Participant
    Club Member

    Sounds like you have found the cause in this case. But worth sharing an other possible…… We once found a rubber brake hose that decayed internally transformed its self into a one way valve, locking the brake on.. Once it was disconnected at car end & straightened out , it merrily squirted brake fluid back out, over the owner!

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